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Archive for April, 2015

This week’s class is the last “normal” class session of the CCD year, and it didn’t come a week too soon. Next week, we will meet in the church for our “instructional Baptism.” I have written before how much Mrs. Rudolphi and I enjoy this group of students. They are personable, funny, well behaved and respectful, but also energetic and, usually, engaged. However, spring is clearly in the air. It is still light outside. The weather is great. And, for the most part, the children don’t really want to be there. (Which might have been the reason why only 11 of our 17 students were present.) Keeping their attention this week was a chore.

By the way, Mrs. Rudolphi was not able to assist on Wednesday. My wife, Patty, joined the fun.

Our topic was the Sacrament of Matrimony, including the outlines of a Catholic marriage and family. Sometimes this can be a sensitive subject, so we started off with a warning. I don’t know the details of all our students’ families, and don’t really need to. However, it is quite likely there are students in our class who have experienced divorces and/or other unusual family situations, with their parents or other members of their family. I emphasized that while we would be teaching the Church’s position on marriage, the students should not take anything as a criticism or judgment on any particular people or situations.

Some of the key points we discussed were:

— Jesus thought enough of the importance of marriage to perform his first miracle at the wedding feast at Cana.

— Marriage has been part of the human experience since the very beginning – ie: Adam and Eve.

— Boys and girls, and men and women are different but equal.

— A Catholic marriage is intended to be a permanent commitment. We talked about some short-lived celebrity marriages and the popular concept of a “starter marriage,” but indicated the Church believes you should enter into a marriage fully aware and prepared and with the full intention of making it a life-long commitment. We discussed the concept of a covenant.

— While the Catholic Church makes it difficult to get out of a marriage, it also makes it difficult to get into it. Priests and other non-Catholic clergy frequently screen couples and can decline to marry them.

— We discussed the difference between a promise and a vow. A promise is made between one person and another. A vow is a promise made to God. The marriage commitment is a vow.

-–The difference between a civil marriage and a religious marriage. A wedding before a judge may cover the legal aspects of marriage, but is very different than a religious marriage, where two people stand before God and promise to maintain a life-long commitment. A Catholic marriage covers both the civil and religious aspects. We were asked whether you could have a civil wedding and then later have a religious wedding. We gave several examples of how this happens.

–We also discussed the concept that in Matrimony, the bride and groom are the actual celebrants and the priest is a witness and blesses the union.

From there we said that Matrimony forms the basis for a Catholic family. We talked about responsibilities within families, including the responsibilities of children. We drew two columns on the white board and head one “adults” and the other “children.” We first asked the class to name responsibilities of the adults or parents in a family and we got the set of answers you would expect – cook dinner, financial support, teach children, etc. When we asked about the other side of the chart, the going was a little more difficult. Aside from household chores, the idea that they might have some responsibilities towards their parents was a little strange.

We threw out some suggestions and got them thinking. Several students mentioned the obligation to respect their parents; to listen to them; and to try to fulfill their parents’ wishes and expectations.

We introduced two concepts. (Parents, you can thank us later for this.) The first was to respect their parents; to listen to them; and to try to fulfill their parents’ wishes and expectations. In other words, “Don’t make your parents’ job of raising you difficult.”

The second concept was to give their parents the opportunity to spend time with each other. Don’t be so needy and demanding of their parents’ every waking minute that they never to spend any time with just them.

Next week will be the final CCD class session. As I have mentioned before, all the CCD classes will meet in the Church. We will have an instructional Baptism. This is a real Baptism. The child to be baptized is the daughter of one of our parish families. (She portrayed the Baby Jesus in the Christmas Pageant.) Monsignor Costigan did one of these around six years ago and it turned out very well. Although it is the last class, this is one our students will not want to miss. Parents are most welcome to stay for the class/ceremony, however, if you do not, drop off and pick up will be at the church.

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Monsignor Costigan visited our class at my request last night.  Originally, the class was to be focused on the Sacrament of Holy Orders. However, I thought it would be more interesting to have Monsignor to come and talk about his life as a priest and the priesthood in general, and to answer questions.

He did a great job and the class seemed genuinely interested. There were a TON of questions. After a series of questions focused on the “seal of the confessional,” I did need to ask the class to broaden out their questions. Fifth graders love to come up with convoluted “what if…” scenarios that sometimes need to be reined in.

Next week will be our last traditional class period, and we will cover the Sacrament of Matrimony. This is usually an interesting class with lots of questions and discussion. I’m looking forward to it.

We will cap off the CCD year with a final class on April 29. We will have a “teaching Baptism.” This will involve all or nearly all grades. We will have a full-scale baptism of the infant daughter of one of our parish families, and Monsignor will explain each of the prayers and actions as he proceeds. We did this several years ago and it was a big success. We will finish up with some kind of reception/refreshments. Should be fun.

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We’re almost home, parents. The barn is in sight. Don’t give up on us now. A few of our “regulars” were absent last night, and we missed them. It’s been three weeks since our last regular class. We had our CCD Penance service last week. It went very well and I think the students who were there thought it was a rewarding and meaningful experience.  In our year-long coverage of the Sacraments, we are five down and two to go. We covered #5 yesterday, Anointing of the Sick.

We began by comparing the Sacrament of today with the old, “Last Rites” or Extreme Unction of yesteryear. It is no longer administered to just those on their death bed, but the grace of the Sacrament can benefit anyone who is sick, undergoing surgery or any other health issue. We talked a little about the mind-body-spirit connection. Anointing of the Sick is not faith-healing and is not intended to cure a person’s ailment. It can give a person a sense of peace that may allow their body to heal better.

We discussed who can and should receive the Sacrament, and when and where it is administered.

We had one student read a blow-by-blow description of the way the Sacrament is administered while two other students role-played a priest and a sick person. (We actually used some olive oil as chrism and they did NOT make a mess of it!)

We finished with the end of the chapter quiz and discussed the answers.  And as always, we asked each student to cite one thing they learned during the class and rewarded them with a chocolate chip cookie.

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