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Archive for February, 2019

We had another good class last night. Mrs. Hanzel took half the lesson and did a great job.

In the first half of the class period, we finished up the exercise on the Commandments we began last week. The class was broken into groups of two or three and asked to come up with a list of commandments that were appropriate and relevant to fifth graders. The students really got into the exercise. They presented their results and they were great.

Mrs. Hanzel then took the lead and presented a lesson on the season of Lent. We started by showing a video which you can watch here.

The audio was not very strong, so we told the class they needed to be quiet and to listen carefully. They must have been interested because we didn’t hear a peep. Mrs. Hanzel then passed out a Lent questionnaire and a graphic drawing showing a path through the six weeks of Lent, and we talked about it.

Important note: We will have no class for the next two weeks. Here is what the rest of the year looks like.

February 27 – No class due to First Penance

March 6 – Ash Wednesday. Mass and distribution of ashes for your family at 7 pm.

March 13 – We will cover the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

March 20 – No class. SCCPSS spring break

March 27 — Penance Service in the church. Students should report to the classroom.

April 3 – We will cover the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick.

April 10 – We will cover the Sacrament of Matrimony

April 17 – THIS IS THE LAST CLASS. We will cover the Sacrament of Holy Orders, most likely with a guest speaker.

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We had a good class last night. We finished off our coverage of the Ten Commandments and started a group exercise that we will continue next Wednesday.

We started out by pointing out that the first three commandments, which we covered last week, deal with our relationship with God, while the last seven address our relationships with other people.

#4. “Honor your father and mother” As mentioned above, we emphasized the need to love and respect your parents throughout their life and to help and support them when they need it. We talked a little about the role reversal that frequently happens in life. Right now, the students are highly dependent on their parents. 30 or 40 years from now their parents might be dependent on them.

#5 “You shall not kill” Not a lot of discussion here.

#6 “You shall not commit adultery” Surprisingly, the first student I called up on could define adultery. We emphasized the importance of the marriage vows, but did not wander far afield on this one.

#7 “You shall not steal” Again, this one was pretty obvious to the class. We did broaden the definition to go beyond just physical objects to include intangibles like ideas, software, pirated music downloads, and so on.

#8 False witness – Most of the class had a pretty good general idea of what this was all about. However, we expanded the discussion to include issues more relevant to them, like gossip and rumors.

#9 & 10 Two “covet” commandments – We described “covet” as to want something so badly that you are willing to commit a wrong to get it. Regarding coveting a neighbor’s goods, it pointed out that it is OK to admire something like a new phone or something similar a friend gets. But when you want it so badly you are willing to steal it, it is coveting.

We didn’t spend a lot of time on the issue of coveting another’s wife or husband, but we did point out that God so values marriage that two of the commandments refer to it. The adultery commandment applies to the people within the marriage, but the covet commandment addresses someone outside the relationship.

We then retold the story of Moses and Mt. Sinai with a minor revision. In this story there was a group of fifth graders in the crowd when Moses presented the Commandments. The fifth graders objected, saying there wasn’t really much there that applied to them, since they are really into murder and aren’t even sure what that adultery thing is. They sent Moses back up the mountain to ask God for another set of Commandments, this one relevant to 5th graders. We broke the class into four small groups and gave them poster boards and markers. We told them to imagine they are God, and to come up with a second set of Commandments, this one applying to the issues fifth graders face.

We let them work on that for about ten minutes until it was time for pick-up. We will continue next week and allow them to present their commandments to the class. We will then take a little time to talk about Lent.

There will be NO CCD in two weeks, on February 27.

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First off, an apology for not being more regular in writing these updates. Some health/medical issues in my family have caused a great deal of disruption to our normal routine.

On Wednesday, Mrs. Hanzel started he class with a review of last week’s lesson, with a focus on knowing The Lord’s Prayer. Then we stepped outside the normal curriculum to take a look at the Ten Commandments. This subject used to be a part of the 5th grade curriculum, but it dropped out when we switched textbooks a few years ago. However, since these classes produced such engagement and energy, I kept them a part of our curriculum.

We started by telling the story of the Israelites escape from Egypt and how they came the base of Mt. Sinai. We talked about how they were worshiping idols, generally misbehaving and needed a set of rules to live by. We then had the students take turns reading aloud from Exodus Chapter 20, which is the first description of the Commandments.

We distributed a listing of the Commandments that included a chart showing how they are numbered differently in different religions. (Most Protestant churches break up the first three “God Commandments” into four and combine the “covet commandments” into just one.) We pointed out that this is only an issue when you discuss a particular commandment with a Protestant friend. If you are discussing the Fourth Commandment, a Catholic would be talking about “Honor your mother and father,” but the Protestant friend would be talking about keeping holy the Sabbath. We walked our way through the first three Commandments with these key points.

#1 “I am the Lord your God…” We discussed how worshiping statues and other idols was common in the time of Moses. We asked the class to think about false gods in a modern sense. We broke the class into small groups and asked them to brainstorm some things that modern people might place higher than God. They came up with things like money, popularity, music stars, gambling, alcohol abuse, drugs, and even electronic games.

#2 “You shall not make wrongful use of the name of God” We talked about using God’s name improperly. We also pointed out that the early Jewish people took this commandment so far as to give God a name that could not be pronounced. It eventually evolved into Yahweh or Jehovah.

#3 “Keep holy the Sabbath” We discussed why Christians changed the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday, and the requirement to attend Mass on Sunday.

Next week, we will complete our coverage of the last seven Commandments. Either next week or the following week (depending on our progress), we will introduce our favorite exercise of the CCD year, when we ask the class to come up with a set of commandments relevant to modern 5th graders. That is always interesting.

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