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Posts Tagged ‘St. peter the apostle catholic church’

My apologies for not posting a summary of last week’s class. We had a family situation that took me out of town.

For the past two weeks, we have covered the Sacrament of Baptism. Last week, we handed out a question sheet, and asked the students to answer some questions about themselves, like…

My name is:
I was born on:
I was baptized on:
At (church):
My Godparents are:

We were pretty sure there would be unanswered questions, so we asked them to take the sheet home with them and ask their parents for help. Most returned them this week, and learned a little about themselves in the process.

We started into the chapter in the textbook. We had volunteers read the first page. We handed out a sheet with questions, the answers for which were contained in the text, and asked the students to locate and answer the questions.

1. Does everyone get baptized at the same age? (No)
2. What do we call adults or older children who are preparing for Baptism? (catechumens)
3. Who helps prepare people for Baptism? (the entire Church community)
4. What do Godparents do? (multiple answers)
5. What is the best day to be Baptized? (Sunday)

On the issue of godparents, we did make a distinction between what it means in the Church, as opposed to a common lay meaning. Outside the church godparents are often considered the intended guardians of a child if both parents should die. Within the Church, that may or may not be the case. We explained that frequently godparents are not a couple, and may be married to other people (eg: an aunt from one side of the family and an uncle from the other.) Within the Church, the godparents stand up for a child during the ceremony and answer questions in his or her place. They are also expected to be involved in the child’s life, especially their spiritual life.

Last night we picked up where we left off. We passed out a sheet with ten questions. The answers were to be found in the text. We had them read one pages silently and answer the questions for that page. Then we had volunteers read the last two pages, again with the students looking for the answers to the questions. Then we talk about the questions and answers.

I have been using this technique because I found that just having the students read something silently, or having volunteers read from the text doesn’t cause anything to “stick” with them. To be honest, the same applies when I just talk. Last night, we spent 5-10 minutes discussing original sin and answering questions. Just a few minutes later, quite a few students were totally stumped when they encountered a question about original sin and Baptism’s role with it. It was like our discussion never happened.

Sigh.

In any case, by having them actually have to think about a question, find the answer in the text and write it down, I hope some of the material may not totally float out of their brains when the class is over.

Then we came to the fun (risky) part of the lesson. We divided the class into three groups of three and had them role-play a Baptism. One student was the priest, one the catechumen and one the godparent. We had water, oil, a white garment (tee-shirt) and a candle – the four symbols of the Sacrament. We gave them a few minutes to prepare and then had them walk through the process. I let the “priest” say the prayers and anoint with oil, but I dribbled the water. There was no point in providing them with too much temptation for mischief.

The exercise did not go totally off the rails. It actually went fairly well. The students really got into it. Hopefully, by acting out the Sacrament, they may actually remember it.

I wasn’t going to ask them what they learned, but several students jumped right up and started telling me. So we went through the class, and everyone was able to cite something, and was rewarded with a cookie.

I just received word a few minutes ago (Thursday morning) that our fifth grade WILL participate in the Christmas Pageant on December 19. Our class will be the narrators. Please note, this is different from what I told the children last night, when I thought we were not going to be part. So the next two classes will be devoted to rehearsal with the “performance” on December 19.

No class next week, the evening before Thanksgiving. Well see everyone back on November 28.

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We lost one class night to Hurricane Michael (Oct 10.) Last week, just as we were getting going, Mrs. Huber came in and asked if anyone would like more advanced altar server training. Almost everyone did, so we spent the class session in the church. We did have two students, Laney and Savannah, who did not have the chance to teach their part of the lesson from two weeks ago (https://stpeterccdgrade5.wordpress.com/2018/10/) , so after we returned from church, they had a chance to teach a short lesson on the Kingdom of God. .

Last night, we began our coverage of the Sacraments with a broad overview (Ch 3 in the text). We are still trying to get and keep the students engaged in the lesson of the night. The distractions created by the guys (not the girls) having their own side shows is lessening, but is still an issue. I am still spending too much time, energy and attention to admonishing them to “Turn around” or “Stop talking.” Mrs. Rudlophi has not been able to be there for the past several weeks, so I have been soloing.

We started by handing out a work sheet with two columns, labeled…

Sacraments I have received

Sacraments I expect to receive at some time

We asked them to fill in the boxes based on their own experience. We used this as a springboard to explain each Sacrament.

We divided the class into pairs and threes and asked them to read P 36 together and to answer three questions which they would find the answers in the text.

What are some of the signs of God’s love in the world? (Many good answers)

What is the greatest gift of God’s love? (Jesus)

What is sanctifying grace?

This led to a good discussion of grace. Most had just a scant understanding, and the definition in the book didn’t help much. We explained grace as simply being God’s love for them. To bring it to life, we asked if there were times that they felt their parents love more than others. Many good answers, like hugs, comforting moments, and so on. We used this concept to explain that the Sacraments are God’s way of transmitting his love to us, just like a parent transmits his or her love through a hug or a kiss.

We showed the class that the Sacraments are divided into three categories.

Sacraments of Initiation (Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist)

Sacraments of Healing (Reconciliation, Anointing of the Sick)

Sacraments of Service of Communion (Holy Orders, Matrimony)

We had some discussion, but not as much as I am used to from previous classes. It was a good discussion and they seemed to grasp the concepts.

And as always, we ended by asking each student to cite something they leared during the class and rewarded their answer with a cookie.

Next Wednesday is Halloween. We will not have class. We will resume November 7.

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Sorry for the late post. We had a good class session last week. We are all still getting to know each other, so I expect our interaction and class participation will pick up in coming weeks.

We tackled chapter one in the text. We discussed Jesus’s baptism and the role of John the Baptist.

We discussed the Holy Trinity. We explained that as mere humans, we cannot understand the concept of three persons in one God, but we gave a couple of examples to help draw the students close.

With about 15 minutes left on the clock,  we took two pages from chapter 1 and divided it up into four sections. We asked the students to pair-up with a partner and assigned each team one section to read, understand and to teach back to the rest of the class. We ran out of time before we completed this, so we will pick up where we left off this week.

And as we do during nearly all our classes, we asked each student to cite something they learned that evening. All wee able to come up with something and were rewarded with a cookie.

We sent the students home with a Mass activity sheet for them to complete on Sunday. we will collect them this week and distribute another week’s worth.

Somewhat to our surprise, it actually went very well. They students really got into the exercise and exhibited energy and creativity. Yea!

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Hello 5th grade CCD parents!

Mrs. Rudolphi and I are looking forward to teaching your child’s CCD class on Wednesday evenings.

The 5th grade curriculum will focus on the liturgy and the sacraments. While we have some material we need to cover, including some memorization, we also hope to make the short time we will spend together rewarding and enjoyable for your child. We have been asked to emphasize some “back to basics.” So we will be making a strong effort to make sure the children know and understand some of our most commonly used prayers. We will focus hard on one and, then, after several weeks move on to another. You can help us by working on this at home with prayers before bed and so on.

It has been our experience that, when they get going, 5th graders and full of interesting questions. If it has anything remotely related to God, the Church, religion, or living, we will talk about it.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Please understand we will have your child for less than an hour, just once a week. You can do several things to help us make this a productive experience for your son or daughter.

• Ask your child if we have given them a task to do during the week and assist them with it.

• Please have your child to the school before 6:30 p.m.

• Please support us and encourage your child to come to CCD class willingly and with enthusiasm.

As we will be covering the sacraments, including matrimony and anointing of the sick, our class discussion may come in close contact to real-life events in your child’s life (death in the family, divorce, etc.) If there is something I should know in order to be appropriately sensitive, please tell me.

Since the Mass is the center point of our faith, we have also been asked to strongly encourage attendance at Sunday Mass. (And since 5th graders are reliant on their parents to take them to Mass, this falls on you.) We will provide your child with a “My Mass Notes” sheet each week for him or her to take to Mass. They should complete the form and return it the next class. We will provide some token incentives/rewards for those students who are most diligent.

OUR EXPECTATIONS OF YOUR CHILD

We have only three class-rules, and we hope you will help us reinforce these to your children.

1. Show up.

2. Participate

3. Don’t be a “jerk.”

Rule #3 can sometimes become an issue. We don’t expect our students to sit quietly with their hands folded on their desk; we don’t want them to do so. We encourage them to be enthusiastic, active and engaged. However, we have a fairly low tolerance for behavior that is overtly disruptive. We try to plan activities that will engage and interest the class, but that only works if the students are at least slightly cooperative.

You are most welcome to sit-in on the class at any time, and we encourage you to do so.

THE CLASS WEBSITE

I hope you will stay abreast of what’s happening with your child on Wednesday evenings. To help you do so, I have created a blog/website. I will try to keep it updated on a weekly basis with reports on the class activity and announcements.

https://stpeterccdgrade5.wordpress.com/

The summaries of past years’ classes are there on the site, so if you would like to get an idea of what is ahead, you can look backwards and see. Please note, for the 2016-17 year, Mrs. Rudolphi and I taught sixth grade so the website reflects that. However, the summaries for other years are all 5th grade.

OTHER STUFF

If you have not already done so, please provide me with your email address. We have learned through experience that trying to communicate with parents through the filter of a 10 or 11 year-old just doesn’t work.

As we have done for the past several years, we ask that you come to the classroom to pick up your child at 7:30 p.m. Please do not instruct your child to leave the building on his or her own and meet you in the parking lot. If you have a situation that makes it difficult for you to come into the building, like a sleeping baby, just let us know. One of us will walk your child(ren) to your car.

Feel free to contact Mrs. Rudolphi or myself for any reason.

Mike Sullivan
Office: 598-2325
Cell: 484-2622
savannahmike1130 at gmail.com

Shelly Rudolphi
Home: 897-9335
Shelly.rudolphi at att.net

All the best,

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We had a very short class last night, because only one of our eight students made it. It must have been a busy night on the middle school activity circuit. Since our lesson plan revolved around some group activities, we just saved the lesson plan for January.

Our last class before the Christmas break (We’re a church, so we don’t have to say “holiday break.”) will be next Wednesday, December 14. We will meet in the church for the Christmas Pageant. Bring the family!

One “heads up,” I strongly suspect the Christmas Pageant will not take the entire 60 minute class period. If you cannot stay for the pageant, you should be prepared to return before 730 to pick up your child.

Meanwhile, Merry Christmas! We hope to see everyone on January 4.

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As I mentioned in last week’s post, we are taking a three-prong approach to the material, at least for the first few weeks.

We opened by asking the students to break into groups of two or three and to complete this week’s Faith Assessment quiz. This week’s FA focused on our parish and diocese. If interested, you can see the quiz on the parish Web site.

http://saintpetertheapostle.com/church/knowledge-of-faith-assessment-knowing-your-parish-diocese/

We had an interesting discussion of the material.

We showed a short (7 minute) video on the life of Mother Theresa.

Then we moved into the Confirmation prep phase of the class by distributing the text and asking the students to spend a minute or two flipping through it. Since much of our Confirmation prep will involve discussions of the Holy Spirit, I thought it would be a good idea to make sure the students had a decent handle on just who the Holy Spirit is. As we went around the class asking for answers to “Just who or what is the Holy Spirit?” we received a variety of answers. Finally, I asked “OK, in just one word, who is the Holy Spirit?” and several students responded “God!” which, of course is correct.

We spent a little time discussing the Holy Trinity and the relationship between the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. How can there be one God, but three persons? I explained the Church calls this a mystery. As human beings, we are simply not smart enough to fully understand that mystery. However, I pointed out I had a couple of models to share, that are not exact explanations, but night circle the target enough to give them an idea.

The first was to point to themselves and the various parts that make up them. For example, they have a physical body that is them. They also have an intellect and personality — their likes, dislikes, sense of humor, and so on. That is also them, but it is different from their physical body. There is also their spirit or soul, which is distinct from their body and intellect/personality, but just as much a version of the same person.

My second example was to point to the roles each of us play in life. We are a son or daughter, a brother or sister, a friend, an athlete, a student, a musician, and so on. Each is a version of us. When we think of God as the creator of the universe, we are thinking of God the Father. When we think about God as our redeemer, we are thinking about God the Son. When we think about God as the deity who is present with us every day, who we pray to and who helps us, we are thinking of God the Holy Spirit. One God, but three different roles.

Again, emphasized these are not accurate explanations to the mystery of the Holy Trinity, just imperfect examples that might allow them to see a Trinity, but only one God.

We allowed the students to take their textbooks home with them. Please help them to remember to bring them back next week.

As I mentioned in the email I sent this morning, I am not sending next week’s Faith Assessment quiz. I jumped the gun on that. Next week’s exercise is on the Commandments, both the original ten from Exodus (Exodus 20 or 34) , and the two greatest commandments as described by Jesus. (Matthew 22:35-40) We spent two or three class periods in 5th grade discussing the Commandments, so I HOPE our students remember at least a little bit of it. In any case, if you would like to ask your child to take a few momements to review the Commandments in advance of next week’s class, that would be great.

Next week, we will send the Faith Assessment quiz home with our students for research in advance of the next class.

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Good morning!

Sorry I have been a little delayed getting posted in a timely fashion this year. I’ll try to do better. Here is our introductory letter, which you should have seen already. I will be posting a summary of last week shortly.

Hello 6th grade CCD parents!

Mrs. Rudolphi and I are looking forward to teaching your child’s CCD class on Wednesday evenings. If your child was in CCD last year, you will note that Mrs. R and I have moved up to 6th grade, staying with the same group of children.

The 6th grade curriculum will cover several areas, including basic confirmation training and some of the Old Testament. Since this is our first year to teach this grade, we are still trying to plan the entire year. However, we  know we will start with the process of selecting a saint’s name for your child’s Confirmation name.

Your child is in middle school, and so our expectations will be a little higher for him/her. While we will continue to seek ways to keep the instruction interesting and memorable, there will undoubtedly be times when they will be told, “This may not be fun, but you need to learn it anyway.” And we will have some occasional homework or take-home projects.

Please understand I will have your child for less than an hour just once a week. You can do several things to help us make this a productive experience for your son or daughter.

  • Ask your child if we have given them a task to do during the week and assist them with it.
  • Please have your child to the school before 6:30 p.m.
  • Please support us and encourage your child to come to CCD class willingly and with enthusiasm.

We have only three class-rules, and we hope you will help us reinforce these to your children.

  1. Show up.
  1. Participate
  1. Don’t be a “jerk.”

You are most welcome to sit-in on the class at any time, and we encourage you to do so.

I hope you will stay abreast of what’s happening with your child on Wednesday evenings. To help you do so, I have created a blog/Web site. I will try to keep it updated on a weekly basis with reports on the class activity and announcements.

https://stpeterccdgrade5.wordpress.com/

I realize the title is “grade5,” but to be honest, I don’t have the time right now to recreate a new blog with a new URL indicating the 6th grade.

If you have not already done so, please provide me with your email address. We have learned through experience that trying to communicate with parents through the filter of an 11 or 12 year-old just doesn’t work.

As we have done for the past several years, we ask that you come to the classroom to pick up your child at 7:30 p.m. Please do not instruct your child to leave the building on his or her own and meet you in the parking lot. If you have a situation that makes it difficult for you to come into the building, like a sleeping baby, just let us know. One of us will walk your child(ren) to your car.

Feel free to contact Mrs. Rudolphi or myself for any reason.

Mike Sullivan

Office: 598-2325

Cell: 484-2622

savannahmike1130@gmail.com

Shelly Rudolphi

Home: 897-9335

Shelly.rudolphi@att.net

 

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