Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘st peter’

I would like to thank all our parents for their cooperation, arranging their schedules and transportation around the CCD Christmas Pageant. The program last Wednesday evening went very well, and the presentation at Christmas Eve Mass even better. I thought your children all did very well. I made an effort to try to speak to each one after the program and praise them for their effort. In the event I missed one in the scurrying around, please extend my compliments to them. I got one photo of the readers as they stood on the altar steps during the singing of “Silent Night.” If anyone would like a copy, just shoot me an email and I’ll send a full-size image to  you. Meanwhile, have a great holiday season and we’ll see you on January 15.Christmas Pageant 1 w

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Hello, 5th grade CCD parents!

Mrs. Rudolphi and I are looking forward to teaching your child’s CCD class on Wednesday evenings.

The 5th grade curriculum will focus on the liturgy and the sacraments. While we have some material to cover, including some memorization, we also hope to make the short time we will spend together rewarding and enjoyable for your child.

It has been our experience that, when they get going, 5th graders and full of interesting questions. If it has anything remotely related to God, the Church, religion, or living, we will talk about it.

Please understand I will have your child for less than an hour just once a week. You can do several things to help us make this a productive experience for your son or daughter.

  • Ask your child if we have given them a task to do during the week and assist them with it.
  • Please have your child to the school before 6:30 p.m.
  •  Please support us and encourage your child to come to CCD class willingly and with enthusiasm.

As we will be covering the sacraments, including matrimony and anointing of the sick, our class discussion may come in close contact to real-life events in your child’s life (death in the family, divorce, etc.) If there is something I should know in order to be appropriately sensitive, please tell me.

We have only three class-rules, and we hope you will help us reinforce these to your children.

1. Show up.

2. Participate

3. Don’t be a “jerk.”

(You might be surprised how well 5th graders understand Rule #3. It almost never requires any further explanation.)

You are most welcome to sit-in on the class at any time.

I hope you will stay abreast of what’s happening with your child on Wednesday evenings. To help you do so (and for the fourth year), I have created this blog/Web site.  I will try to keep it updated on a weekly basis with reports on the class activity and announcements. You might wish to bookmark this site for future reference.

The full rundown of last year’s class is here on the site, so if you would like to get an idea of what is ahead, you can look backwards and see.

The fifth grade class will be teaming up with the third grade to present the Christmas pageant. If things go according to plan, the pageant will be presented twice – once during the regular CCD class time and once at one of the Christmas Eve masses. When the dates draw closer, I’ll keep you apprised of scheduling. The biggest issue will be to coordinate the Christmas Eve reader-team with your family plans.

If you have not already done so, please provide me with your email address. (My email is below.) Last year, when we were trying to organize the Christmas pageant, it became glaringly obvious that trying to communicate with parents through the filter of a 10 or 11 year-old just doesn’t work. I will use the blog to communicate routine information. I’ll only use the email to notify you of things like schedule changes and the like.

As we have done for the past several years, we ask that you come to the classroom to pick up your child at 7:30 p.m. Please do not instruct your child to leave the building on his or her own and meet you in the parking lot. If you have a situation that makes it difficult for you to come into the building, like a sleeping baby, just let us know. One of us will walk your child(ren) to your car.

Feel free to contact Mrs. Rudolphi or myself for any reason. Our contact info is under the “About” tab at the top of this page.

Read Full Post »

Our CCD schedule has been a little weird for the past few weeks and will continue so until the Christmas break. Here’s the story.

December 12 (next week) 6-730 pm – Rehearsal for the nine students and two shepherds who are in the Christmas pageant on December 19 and (in some cases) December 24. This includes:

Readers

  • Danielle C (also Dec 24)
  • Brendan C
  • Caroline J
  • Jacob E
  • Elizabeth Anne C (also Dec 24)
  • Jake F (also Dec 24)
  • Autumn H
  • Madeline H (also Dec 24)
  • Hannah B

Shepherds

  • Will G
  • Carter P

There may be another shepherd. I’m not sure. Check with your child. If he/she says they are a shepherd, they probably are.

The remainder of the class has the night off.

Please drop-off and pick-up your child at the church. The school will be closed that evening.

Please note – The start time on December 12 will be 6:00 pm. If you can’t get your child to the church by then, it won’t be the end of the world, but if you can accommodate the earlier time, it would be great.

Also, the students will be served pizza after the rehearsal.

Saturday, December 15 – A final rehearsal for the Christmas pageant for readers and shepherds. I believe it is at 10 am. We’ll confirm that next week.

Wednesday, December 19 6:30 pm – Christmas pageant in church, followed by refreshments and snacks in the school gym. Everyone should attend, as it this is essentially a regular CCD time slot. This will be the final CCD class before the Christmas break. We hope parents will join their children for the pageant, but if you are not able to do so, drop off your child at the church, but pick up at the school.

Monday, December 24, 6:00 pm Mass – The four readers who have volunteered to participate in the pageant-portion of the Mass should attend. Please have your child there early. 5:30 pm would be good. Certainly no later than 5:45 pm. Please have them dressed nicely. The readers for this Mass are Danielle, Elizabeth Anne, Jake F and Madeline.

Questions? Call or email me.

Last night, half the class was involved in the rehearsal for the pageant, which left me with only around nine students for a class. We had an informal discussion of the season of Advent, focusing on the concept of preparing ourselves spiritually for the coming of Christ. Then we went over to the church and listened to their classmates work on their readings.

 

Read Full Post »

We had a busy night last evening. The class was lively and engaged.

We started with a chapter review of last week’s lesson on prayer, the various types of prayer, etc. Terms like “petition” and “intercession” didn’t stick very well, but overall, the students seemed to get the general idea. We were extremely encouraged to note the number of students who volunteered that they have been trying to spend at least 30 seconds in private prayer every day. Most said they did so during their moment of silence at school. Whatever works! (Parental encouragement is always helpful on this point!)

Our primary lesson was the first of two on forgiveness and the Sacrament of Reconciliation.  We started by reading the story of the prodigal son. (Luke 15:21- ) As we discussed the story, we asked how they would react if they had been the father or the other brother in the story. Most agreed that the son who blew his part of his father’s fortune shouldn’t get off easy. We contrasted this most natural human reaction to God’s infinite love. We emphasized that God’s capacity for forgiveness is infinite and there is nothing they could do that is so evil that God would not accept them back with open arms. Several students asked about sinners in Hell and Satan. “If God will forgive anything, what’s their story?” We replied that you must ask for forgiveness and express remorse (contrition). We’ll cover the four main steps of forgiveness when we hit the next chapter (in three weeks.)

We broke the class up into small groups of 3-4 students each and asked them to work as a team to write, and then act out, a short story about the act of forgiving. I was a little surprised how much they got into this project. Each group did a very good job acting out their little scenario.

We presented the biblical story of Jesus’s giving the Apostles and their successors the power to forgive sins (John 20:21-23).

As the clock started to run down to dismissal time, we briefly covered the concept of sin. We asked the question. “Can you sin, while doing nothing?” We discussed the concept of sinning through inaction. That is, not doing something that they ought to do. We re-introduced them to the Confiteor and read the prayer together, with an emphasis on…

“…I have greatly sinned in my thoughts and in my words, in what I have done and in what I have failed to do…”

Next week, we’ll have a special class. Cathy Scanlon will take our class on a guided tour of the church with explanations for the various symbols, objects, etc. It should be interesting. I expect I’ll learn something myself. If any parents would like to come along for a refresher, you would be most welcome. We’ll meet in the classroom and then walk over to the church. We’ll bring the children back to the school for after-class pick up — probably in the school lobby.

The following week is Ash Wednesday (Feb 22). We will not have CCD class that week, but I believe there will be an ashes service that evening. As they say at Mass, “Check the bulletin for other important announcements.”

We’ll be back on February 29. (Yes, it’s Leap Year, folks.) We’ll be focusing on the four steps of any forgiveness process and the specifics of the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

 

Read Full Post »

Our mission last night was to finish up our lesson on the Eucharist. Our focus was on the Mass, or more specifically, the elements and order of the Mass. I suspected that many in the class really had little idea of what was happening in the Mass, the flow, the purpose of various parts, and so on. So I put together and distributed a two-page “Order of the Mass” and issued each student a missalette.

We started by talking about the recent changes in the priest’s prayers and our responses, and the reasons behind the changes. We talked about the old Latin mass and the changes of the Second Vatican Council.

We compared the Order of the Mass to the students going with their family to visit another family or relatives for dinner. In the Mass, we are visiting God’s house, but the general concept can be similar. For example:

When we go to someone’s house, we are welcomed, just as we are at Mass.

When we go to someone’s house, we start out by talking and visiting. In the Mass (Liturgy of the Word), we also exchange communication with God. Our prayers (Kyrie, Gloria, etc.) we address God, and in the readings, God addresses us.

When we visit someone’s house for dinner, we always bring something like dessert or wine. In the offertory, we present gifts to God.

The comparison becomes even closer in the Preparation of the Gifts and the Eucharist itself.

I don’t know how well that idea sunk into the class, but we tried.

We walked through the order of the Mass, referring to both the simple outline I had drawn up and also the missalette. We pointed out several spots in the missalette where it can be difficult to follow.  For example, there are four Eucharistic prayers, and you never know which one the priest will use (although it seems as if #2 seems to be the most common.)

We are continuing our effort to try to get all the students engaged in each class. On some evenings, we are more successful than others. As in most groups, there are a number of students who have their hands up constantly, and, frankly, are fairly demanding of attention. On the other hand, there are also some students who are semi-comatose. They occupy a seat and breathe the air, but that is about it. I wish I could pull some of these kids into the flow of the class.  However, with the class size (25 at full strength) and the relatively short time we have together, there really isn’t much time for the individual attention that would require. I am not suggesting these kids are behavior problems.  I just know that these students are learning nothing in the hour they are spending at CCD each week. That’s a shame.

I am certainly not going to “name names” in this forum. However, as a parent you are always free to call me to see how your child is doing. My contact information is under the “About” tab at the top of this page. Also, you are always more than welcome to sit in on any of our classes.  I promise; I won’t ask you any hard questions.  🙂

Read Full Post »